Dienstag, 8. Dezember 2009

Interview with Asra Nomani

'Gender Jihad' in the Service of Women's Rights

The 44-year-old US writer Asra Nomani is viewed as a prominent representative of "Gender Jihad". For the former Wall Street Journal reporter, there is no contradiction between Islam and feminism.

In both western countries and Muslim societies feminism and Islam are mostly regarded as irreconcilable opposites. Why are they not compatible?

Asra Nomani: Yes, I'm always hearing that view at my lectures. But as far as I'm concerned, the two go hand in hand. I think Islam was originally a feminist religion. The Prophet Mohammed was a feminist, like his first wife Khadija, his daughter Fatima and his wife Aisha. None of them allowed themselves to be pushed aside, and they all spoke their minds. I don't think Islamic feminism is an apparent contradiction.

Actually, I meet religious feminists all over the world – Mormon, Catholic, Maronite, Jewish-orthodox, Protestant. My experience is that women have to fight male power in Islam with the same dynamics as in all other religions.

When I mentioned your name to a colleague, the response was: Ah, gender jihad. What's it like to have such a tag?

Nomani: Well, very good, I must say. I'm very proud to be a soldier on this front.

And what is this soldier fighting for?

Nomani: For the rights of women, and at the same time for social justice. Women should not be the preserving jars of honor and purity. They should not be punished for their sexuality, by crouching in the backrooms and corners of mosques.

Women should not be gagged just because they bring men into temptation. These are all just control mechanisms to treat us as second-class citizens.

What's your view on the veiling of women?

Nomani: If you cover the face of a woman, it de-personifies her. The removal of the veil is a crucial element of gender jihad, because by doing this we dispel ignorance.

Now you've received support on this matter from one of the highest authorities in Sunni Islam. Mohammed Sayed al-Tantawi, the Grand Sheikhk of Al Azhar University, has described the niqab (face veil) as un-Islamic and issued a ban at the Cairo seat of learning.

Nomani: Yes, it's very important to us if the Al Azhar University assumes a leading role in this. We need the leaders of the Islamic mainstream to at last inject some reason back into this religion. I'm really happy that al-Tantawi has tackled an ideology that really is terrifying.

What is the problem if someone wants to wear a face veil, even if it only leaves a slit to see through?

Nomani: That's exactly the kind of western political correctness that excuses the niqab as a woman's free choice. This attitude conveniently forgets that it is symbolic of a highly puritanical and dangerous interpretation of Islam.

This justifies violence against women and suicide attacks with an allegedly literal interpretation of the Koran and suggests that a Muslim should not make friends with Jews and Christians if at all possible.

One should remember that our churches are also not allowed to preach racism. Islam should be measured by the same standards. Members of the Ku-Klux-Klan can't collect their drivers' permits with hoods over their heads.

Many Muslim women would be appalled at what you say. They wear the niqab or the hijab (headscarf) with pride.

Nomani: The puritanical interpretation of Islam has presented the niqab and the hijab as a free choice. Young American women think they are strong and independent if they cover their hair or their faces. In doing so they overlook the fact that this is about the sexualization and demonization of women, who apparently distract men from the right path.

I've heard it said by many Muslim women that covering their heads acts as a kind of protection against the sexual advances of men.

Nomani: In Egypt, the Center for Women's Rights published a study in 2008 that showed that women adhering to the Islamic dress code suffered the most sexual harassment. I've experienced it myself, when I was in northern India, one of the most conservative Muslim regions. My hijab did not protect me from sexual harassment. That's a myth that's peddled, and women are taken in by it.

Al-Tantawi claims the niqab is just a tradition that has nothing to do with Islam. How did the niqab come to be associated with Islam?

Nomani: I'll give you an example of how that works. There are translations of the Koran from Saudi Arabia in which passages on the niqab have simply been added in order to sell it as something Islamic. It's the same with the hijab. It's made into an obligation, although it's all only based on interpretations.

What does the Koran say about female clothing? Are there rules on what women should wear?

Nomani: There is nothing decreeing that she must cover her face or hair. There is nothing about a shawl, a headscarf or a veil, nothing about a color, whether it should be pink or black. There is also nothing to say that the hands must be covered, or that she can only show her eyes. These are all the rules of men. In accordance with the interpretation that I think is the right one, a woman should simply be moderate in the choice of her clothing.

In editions of the Koran from Saudi Arabia, which has conducted a missionary campaign in the mosques of the world over the last decade, it's all very different, you say.

Nomani: Yes, and as a Muslim woman I feel very concerned about this. The Saudi Arabian government was able to internationally propagate – virtually unchecked – a rigid, inviolable and monolithic form of Islam.

As the country where the holy sites of Islam are located, Saudi Arabia produces Koran translations and distributes them to millions of pilgrims who travel to Mecca on the Hajj. The translations are sexist and intolerant.

I'm always receiving Koran translations that say I should not make friends with a Jew or a Christian and cover my face, apart from one eye that may remain visible. Another route is via the mosques that were founded all over the world.

So Saudi Arabia is responsible for the propagation of a strict interpretation of Islam. One could almost say it's a lucrative business, when one thinks of the war on terror and the increased price of oil, which is making Saudi Arabia richer than ever.

Nomani: That's absolutely right. And we're not holding the Saudi government responsible for its complicity in the creation of this dangerous ideology.

First it was exported to Pakistan, which is currently a haven for militant Islamists. Then representative congregations were set up all over the world. And I'm not talking about some villages in Pakistan, but about my home city of Morgantown in West Virginia.

How does that work?

Nomani: They take over mosques and teach Wahhabi and Salafi ideology, and the rest of the congregation has to fall into line. It works very well. The men grow beards of a certain length, otherwise they're not regarded as true Muslims. And the women wear veils.

But there must be a need for it somehow. Propaganda alone can't be enough. Is it about a sense of community, of fashion, of being cool?

Nomani: Of course there's a need for it. You're cool if you practice a religion that lies beyond western interpretations. That's why young women think they're rebels because they wear the hijab.

A broad-based fashion protest movement?

Nomani: I believe that religion here is a consumer goods industry. It's a business selling both conservative and liberal ideas within Islam. The industry also has a fashion division – an abaya (traditional Arab cloak-like overgarment) for 10,000 dollars in a boutique in the Gulf, pilgrimage clothing or discreet Islamic bathing suits available on the Internet.

In the liberal sector for example, this happens with T-shifts printed with slogans such as: "This is what a radical Muslim looks like." I'm continually astonished at what is sold as an Islamic product, and how.

Currently it's Islamic music. The funniest thing I saw recently was Islamic underwear. A G-string with the word 'bismillah' (in the name of Allah) visible on the back.

Whether it's a movement, or a fashion: it all has to come to and end at some point. How much longer will it go on for?

Nomani: I think the kind of Islam that wants to force women to wear a veil or a headscarf won't be around in 20 years. Mohammed Sayed al-Tantawi is one of the first leaders to say, indirectly, enough's enough. It's a good sign.

But do Muslim women have to suffer until then?

Nomani: For some time yet, that's for sure. But you must remember that it's not just the women who suffer, the men are also affected. The Taliban demanded that men looked, thought and behaved a certain way, otherwise they were not regarded as true Muslims. Control mechanisms don't stop at women, they are extending further and further.

The Taliban stealthily banished women from public life. In the end, this religious control culminated in the destruction of the Buddha statues. Do you think Tantawi had that in mind?

Nomani: I think he realized that it's not just about the veiling of women. At some point he could also become a target because he does not represent the same interpretation of Islam. It's not just a danger for women, but for us all.

Interview conducted by Alfred Hackensberger for Qantara

Asra Nomani teaches journalism at Georgetown University. She is the author of "Standing Alone in Mecca", of the "Islamic Bill of Rights for Women in the Bedroom", and of the "Islamic Bill of Rights for Women in the Mosque".

Montag, 23. November 2009

Marrakesch, die neue Metropole für billigen Sex

Marrakesch ist zu einem Zentrum des internationalen Sextourismus geworden. Gerade aus den arabischen Ländern am Golf kommen immer mehr Besucher auf der Suche nach schnellem Sex. Im Visier sind dabei nicht nur Frauen, sondern auch junge Männer – und das, obwohl Homosexualität in Marokko gesetzlich verboten ist.

Nach Marrakesch kommen immer mehr Touristen auf der Suche nach billigem Sex. Begehrt sind dabei nicht nur junge Frauen

In einem luxuriösen Appartement in Marrakesch tanzen nackte Mädchen bis in den frühen Morgen. Danach wälzen sie sich zum Amüsement ihrer Kunden über den Fußboden, auf dem Geldscheine ausgestreut sind. Was an den verschwitzten Körpern der Frauen hängen bleibt, ist ihre Entlohnung für die Nacht, die nun erst richtig beginnt. „Dann kommt der Sex“, erklärt Fatima, eine 21-jährige Prostituierte, die sich mit ihrer Freundin Naima auf Kunden aus den arabischen Ländern am Golf spezialisiert hat. „Das ist zwar manchmal wie Sklaverei, dafür zahlen sie aber besser als andere Ausländer.“

Die Besucher aus Saudi-Arabien, Kuwait oder den Arabischen Emiraten sind allerdings nicht nur für ihr Interesse an jungen Frauen bekannt. „Ob hier in Marokko, im Libanon oder in Ägypten“, meint ein Zigarettenverkäufer in Marrakesch, „jeder weiß doch, dass sie auch hinter Männern her sind. Je jünger, desto besser.“

Mit diesen Vorlieben sind die Touristen aus den Golfstaaten in der ehemaligen marokkanischen Königsstadt genau richtig. Marrakesch ist heute, neben dem Atlantik-Badeort Agadir im Süden des Landes, ein Zentrum des internationalen Sextourismus. Am Platz Djamaa al-Fna, mit seinen Magiern, Akrobaten und exotischen Tieren, aber auch in Restaurants und Bars, die von Touristen besucht werden, trifft man neben weiblichen auch jederzeit männliche Prostituierte.

Von Gauklern, Märkten und Palästen

Homosexuelle schätzen „die erotische Atmosphäre einer Männergesellschaft“, wie Stefan S. aus Deutschland bekennt. „Niemanden stört es, wenn Männer auf offener Straße Händchen halten oder sich auf die Wange küssen.“ Zum anderen wegen billigem Sex, der überall leicht zu haben sei. „Vielen Marokkanern macht das auch Spaß“, versichert der 45-jährige Deutsche. „Sie sind verheiratet, haben Kinder, aber gleichzeitig einen Freund.“ Dabei ist Homosexualität in Marokko gesetzlich verboten.

In Marrakesch haben viele Homosexuelle, wie andere Ausländer auch, ein altes Haus gekauft und renoviert. Bevorzugt ein Riad (Haus mit Innenhof) in der Altstadt, die heute hauptsächlich von Spaniern, Franzosen, Engländern oder US-Amerikaner bewohnt wird. In exotisch-orientalischer Atmosphäre feiert man Cocktailpartys und hält Diners.

Dabei können die marokkanischen Hausangestellten schon mal in knappen Lederkostümen oder anderen Fantasieuniformen die Gäste bewirten. Längst hat sich um homosexuelle Touristen eine eigene Sexindustrie gebildet. Viele junge Männer aus verarmten Dörfern der Umgebung zieht es nach Marrakesch, um „leichtes“ Geld zu machen und ihre Familien zu ernähren.

Der Faktor „Armut“ ist laut einem Bericht „Koalition gegen den sexuellen Missbrauch von Kindern“ der entscheidende Faktor, der Kinder zur Prostitution bringt. Pädophilie, der Sex mit Kindern und Jugendlichen (in Marokko bis zum Alter von 18 Jahren), hat in Marrakesch erhebliche Ausmaße angenommen.

Die marokkanische Polizei bildete eine Sondereinheit, die schon oft Ausländer verhaftete. Darunter einen Franzosen, der im Besitz von 17.000 Fotos und 140.000 Videoaufzeichnungen war, die er an pornografische Webseiten verschickte. „Die Situation ist außer Kontrolle“, sagt Najia Adib, die Präsidentin von „Touche pas à mes enfants“.

„Vermittler haben eine Preisliste, was ein Zehnjähriger und ein Zwölfjähriger kosten. Je jünger, desto teurer, da diese vorwiegend von den Sextouristen bestellt werden.“ Erschreckend sei zudem, dass viele der missbrauchten Kinder und Jugendlichen erzählten, sie würden es aus Vergnügen tun – „ich bekomme 500 Dirham (etwa 50 Euro), ohne Touristen ist das nicht möglich“.

In Marokko könnte als nächstes die Hafenstadt Tanger Opfer von Sextouristen werden. Bis 2013 will man dort, so Raschid Ihdeme, Delegierter für Tourismus in Tanger, die Zahl der Hotelgäste auf 1,2 Millionen verdreifachen, etwa 70 neue Hotels sind in der Stadt und in der näheren Umgebung entlang der Atlantik- und Mittelmeerküste geplant.

„Mindestens 10.000 neue Arbeitsplätze“, meint Ihdeme. Im Hafen sollen bald Kreuzfahrtsschiffe in See stechen und Yachten vor Anker liegen. Man will an das Tanger der Internationalen Zone (1923–1956) anknüpfen, das damals Zielpunkt so vieler Künstler und Schriftsteller war.

Auf der Dachterrasse von Baron Francisco Corcuera, einem argentinischen Maler, hat man einen guten Blick über Tanger. „Dort ist die Villa von Yves Saint Laurent“, sagte der Baron und zeigt mit dem Finger auf einen kleinen blauen Punkt im Häusermeer.

„Hier vorne das Haus eines deutschen Fotografen, und das hier hinten gehört einem französischem Schriftsteller. Die guten Häuser, von denen man eine fabelhafte Aussicht auf die Meerenge von Gibraltar hat, sind alle weg“, erklärt der Baron. Die Immobilien seien heute unerschwinglich. „Wegen all der Ausländer, die übrigens zu 90 Prozent homosexuell sind.“ Die meisten davon seien in dieselbe Falle getappt, meint er mit einem spöttischen Unterton. „Sie haben einen Freund, der plötzlich heiratet, Kinder bekommt, und dann bezahlen sie für die ganze Familie, was bis ans Lebensende gehen kann.“

Saudis gehen militärisch gegen jemenitische Rebellen vor

Angriffe im Grenzgebiet gegen Schiitenmiliz

Tanger/Sanaa - Immer wieder stiegen dicke Rauchwolken rund um den Gipfel des Jebel al-Dukhan auf. Der 2000 Meter hohe Berg in der Nähe der Stadt Khubah markiert die Grenze zwischen dem Königreich Saudi-Arabien und der Republik Jemen. Saudische Luftwaffe und Artillerie beschossen Stellungen der Huthi-Rebellen, die angeblich vom Norden des Jemen in saudisches Territorium eingedrungen waren. Nach fünftägigen Kämpfen sei es endlich gelungen, so Prinz Khaled Bin Sultan, der stellvertretende Verteidigungsminister Saudi-Arabiens, das Gebiet von den schiitischen Rebellen wieder zu säubern. Mohammed Abdel-Salam, der Sprecher der Huthis, nannte die saudische Operation "eine ungerechtfertigte Aggression". Gleichzeitig warf man Saudi-Arabien vor, Angriffe auf jemenitischem Staatsgebiet durchgeführt zu haben.

"Wir kümmern uns nur um unser Territorium", entgegnete das saudische Verteidigungsministerium, "und greifen nicht innerhalb des Jemen ein." Nachzuvollziehen wäre es allerdings, wenn Saudi-Arabien der jemenitischen Regierung unter Präsident Ali Abdullah Saleh militärisch zu Hilfe kommen würde, auch auf jemenitischem Territorium. Am 11. August hatte Saleh die Operation "Verbrannte Erde" gestartet. Das vorgegebene Ziel waren die Huthi-Terroristen, die einen Staatsstreich planten und eine schiitische Republik gründen wollten, ein für alle Mal "auszurotten, wo und wie auch immer". Seit 2005 war es immer wieder zu kriegerischen Konflikten zwischen dem Staat und den Huthis im Norden des Landes gekommen. Bisher war jedoch der Aktion der "verbrannten Erde" wenig Erfolg beschieden. Stattdessen hat sie die ökonomische Krise und die politische Instabilität des Landes verstärkt.

Für den Nachbarn Saudi-Arabien, der den Jemen bei seiner Operation mit Geheimdienstinformationen unterstützt hatte, ein Anlass zur Besorgnis. Al-Qaida könnte das Machtvakuum ausnützen und den Jemen "zu einem Schlachtfeld der Dschihadisten und zu einer potenziellen Basis machen", wie es Dennis Blair, der US-Geheimdienstdirektor, bei einer Anhörung des Kongresses in diesem Jahr formulierte. Zum anderen gibt es Befürchtungen, je länger der Konflikt andauert und die Huthis der jemenitischen Armee standhalten, dass der Iran und seine Eliteeinheit der Republikanischen Garden sich entschließen, den schiitischen Rebellen zur Hilfe zu kommen. Gerüchte über eine Unterstützung aus dem Iran gibt es seit dem Beginn der Großoffensive. Vor zwei Wochen wurde dann ein Schiff, das Waffen für die Rebellen geladen hatte, von den jemenitischen Behörden an der Westküste des Landes aufgebracht. Laut Informationsminister Hassan Al-Lawzi habe man Beweise an die Islamische Republik Iran weitergeleitet, die zeigten, dass iranische religiöse Gruppen die Huthis unterstützten. "Die zuständigen Behörden", so Hassan Al-Lawzi, "überprüfen die fünf Besatzungsmitglieder des Schiffs, das in verschiedenen arabischen Häfen Station machte".

Nach dem militärischen Eingreifen Saudi-Arabiens ist der jemenitische Präsident sichtlich zuversichtlich. Am vergangenen Samstag, als es zu schweren Gefechten zwischen saudischen Truppen und Huthis gekommen war, versicherte Ali Abdullah Saleh, der Krieg habe nun erst begonnen. Was sich in den letzten Jahren des Konflikts ereignet habe, sei nur ein Training für die Armee gewesen. Bis heute starben mehrere Tausenden Menschen, und insgesamt rund 150 000 Menschen wurden zu Flüchtlingen. "Nun werde die Armee", so der Präsident weiter, "ihren Angriff so lange weiterführen, bis es mit der tyrannischen, verräterischen Söldnergruppe (der Huthis) zu Ende geht."

Niqab Debate in Egypt: Divided Scholars

Hijab, chador, burqa or niqab? – The veiling of Muslim women continues to provoke controversy. This time it is the niqab, or face veil, at the center of the conflict-charged fundamental debate within the Islamic world. By Alfred Hackensberger

Grand Sheikh Tantawi had banned women from wearing the niqab in parts of the Al-Azhar mosque, saying it had nothing to do with Islam | The bone of contention is none less than the Grand Imam of Cairo University and the Al-Azhar Mosque. Mohammed Sayed al-Tantawi, one of the most senior legal scholars in Sunni Islam, declared that a veil that covers a woman's face leaving only a slit for the eyes is not religiously permissible.

During a visit to one of the schools affiliated to Al-Azhar University early in October, the theologian was irritated by a girl's niqab. He then ordered the baffled girl, who had ironically only worn the veil in honor of the high-ranking visitor, to take it off and never put it on again. "These are traditions that have nothing to do with religion," he explained to the students. At the same time the Imam promised to ban this particular kind of veil from the school grounds.

Reasons of security

A few days later, female students veiled with the niqab were no longer allowed to enter the halls of residence at Al-Azhar University. Those who did not take off their niqab were sent away. The supreme council at the highest seat of religious learning in Sunni Islam had "agreed the ban on the veil," announced Mohamed Abdel-Aziz, deputy chairman of the council. The ban also applies to the girls' classrooms. It affects both teaching staff and the 500,000 girls out of a total of 1.4 million schoolchildren and students who study at the university and its affiliated educational establishments.

The decision was also approved by the Ministry for Higher Education, which announced that it plans to extend the ban to universities across the country. Minister Hany Halal explained the measure would primarily be taken for security reasons. Just recently 15 young men dressed in niqabs tried to enter the girls' dormitories, he said.

"I've been living in a student hall of residence for years," said one female student who wanted to remain anonymous to avoid potential problems with the university administration, "but I've never heard of anything like that happening."

A frightening take on Islam

Asra Q. Nomani says that a security risk is indeed a valid argument. The US author has just published a book titled "Standing Alone: An American Woman's Struggle for the Soul of Islam". But she says such an argument is not based on uninvited male visitors to girls' dormitories. From Islamabad to Baghdad, the niqab has been misused by militant Islamists to avoid police checkpoints or to carry out attacks.

Nomani says however that a much more decisive factor in any move to ban the face veil is "that it stands for a frightening take on Islam, one that preaches the literal interpretation of the Koran." And this is especially problematic in the interpretation of those verses where the meaning is in any case unclear, she adds.

"Militants exploit this to justify domestic violence, intolerance or even suicide attacks," says Nomani. When she talks about "a frightening take on Islam", she is referring to the the schools of thought known as Wahhabism and Salafism, which are based in Saudi Arabia and promote ultra-conservative interpretations of Islam.

There are two sections of the Koran that make this especially clear (Sura 24, verse 31 and Sura 33, verse 59), passages that make references to the covering of the female body. Neither passage can be unequivocally interpreted as an instruction that a woman must wear a head covering, or exactly defines the parts of the body that have to be concealed.

Pieces of clothing are named, such as "jilbab" and "khimar", but it remains unclear what form, color or function they had during the Prophet's era. In a German translation of the Koran commissioned by Saudi Arabia this is not taken into consideration at all, and the word "khimar" is simply translated as "Kopftücher", or "headscarves". One simply has to be aware of the subtleties of meaning can be lost in translation.

"This Wahhabi and Salafi mindset came to Egypt in the 1970s," says Hala Mustafa, editor-in-chief at Al Ahram Media in Cairo. "And it has increased its hold over the last three decades." This is evident on the streets of the capital, with increasing numbers of women covering themselves from head to toe.

"Salafi satellite channels today propagate the message that the niqab is an obligation," explains Salem Abdel Gelil, from the Egyptian Ministry of Religious Endowments, Awqaf.

The government of the Nile nation is not in the least happy about this ultra-conservative trend. The niqab ban at universities is just one of many steps Cairo is taking to counter it. The Ministry of Religious Endowments prints brochures that describe the niqab as un-Islamic. The Health Ministry plans to ban doctors and nurses from wearing the face veil.

Against constitution and freedom

Sumerian temple priestesses wore veils in 5000 B.C. In 1300 B.C., Assyrian kings introduced the veil for married and wealthy women. This is similar to the Byzantines (4th to 5th centuries A.D.), the Sassanids (c. 224-652 A.D.), in Ancient Greece and old Rome, where to be veiled was a privilege reserved for high society.

Grand Sheikh Tantawy based his ban on a constitutional resolution passed in 1996, which allows representatives of the educational system to decide on clothing rules for schools | So the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar University Mohammed Sayed al-Tantawi is absolutely right when he describes the niqab as a tradition from a pre-Islamic era. But this view has not made the theologian – who is known for his headstrong manner – any more popular. He has already come under fire several times for supporting the French ban on the hijab, shaking hands with the Israeli President Shimon Peres, and insisting that women pregnant from rape should have the right to abort.

The conservative Egyptian cleric Youseff al-Badri described the niqab ban as "a violation of a constitution that is there to guarantee public freedom."

The Grand Mufti of Dubai holds a similar view. He spoke of a "restriction of the freedom of women," and said the move was "in total contempt of their faith, their culture and their traditions."

The Saudi Arabian Sheikh Mohammed al-Nojaimi from the Institute of Islamic Law spoke of a possible division of Egyptian society into two camps, for or against the niqab. At the same time, he contradicted his Egyptian counterpart Tantawi's claim that the face veil has nothing to do with Islam: "The niqab is mentioned in reports on the traditions of the Prophet," he said. These state that a woman should only take off her face veil during the pilgrimage to Mecca, as "this goes to prove that she wore it at all other times."

"What are wearers of the niqab supposed to do?"

For devout Muslims who wear the niqab out of conviction, the Egyptian ban is tantamount to a defeat, even if it is restricted to universities. They have become accustomed to the fact that action is taken against the headscarf or veil in western countries. And perhaps also in the few secular countries where most of the population are Muslims, such as in Turkey or Tunisia.

But now the veil, a piece of clothing that has so often had to be defended against criticism, is being declared un-Islamic by members of the Muslim community, and furthermore by one of the most senior legal scholars in Sunni Islam. The result is helplessness.

"What are we supposed to do?" asks Sadaf Farooqi in the Saudi-Gazette newspaper. "What's really unsettling is the swift global impact of this development," writes the columnist, who lives in Karachi. "Within a few days after Mohammed Sayed al-Tantawi's comments, all kinds of groups from Italy to Canada began calling for a ban on the niqab."

Farooqi writes that such groups also include "self-proclaimed progressive Muslims." Of course these feminist Muslims now feel vindicated, after all, they have for a long time described the veil as an antiquated tradition that does not belong to Islam.

"It is high time to impose a global ban on the face veil," writes US author Asra Q. Nomani. "It is the expression of an Islam that must disappear."

For Sadaf Farooqi, who is proud to wear her niqab, this is something she finds difficult to understand. The journalist thanks God that in her country, she is allowed to leave the house in her veil, visit educational establishments and go for a walk without fear of abuse. "A luxury that our Muslim sisters in Britain, France and Canada do not enjoy," she says.

Alfred Hackensberger

© Qantara.de 2009

Translated from the German by Nina Coon

Montag, 12. Oktober 2009

"Arabia Felix" steht am Abgrund

Regierung gegen Separatisten: Im Jemen entscheidet sich, ob das islamistische Terrornetzwerk al-Qaida eine neue Basis aufbauen kann

Sanaa - "Jemen ist Arabiens unbekannter Edelstein, den es noch zu entdecken gilt", heißt es im Bordmagazin "Yemenia". Das Hochglanzblättchen empfiehlt Bergwanderungen und Trekkingtouren durch die atemberaubende Heimat der legendären Königin von Saba.

Aber damit lassen sich keine Abenteuertouristen mehr in den Jemen locken. "Arabia Felix", das altrömische glückliche Arabien, ist selbst für hartgesottene Reisende nach diversen Entführungen ein bisschen Abenteuer zu viel. Im Juni waren zwei deutsche Frauen und eine Koreanerin getötet worden. Der Rest der gekidnappten Touristengruppe, eine fünfköpfige Familie aus Sachsen und ein Brite, werden noch immer vermisst.

Zwei Drittel des Jemen stehen nicht unter Regierungskontrolle. Separatisten herrschen dort, lokale Stämme, die al-Qaida nahestehen oder auf eigene Rechnung arbeiten. In der Provinz Saada, der nördlichen Grenzregion zu Saudi-Arabien, herrscht Krieg: Zum sechsten Mal seit 2004 versucht dort die Regierung unter Präsident Ali Abdallah Saleh die schiitischen Rebellen des Al-Huthi-Clans zu zerschlagen. Ein Konflikt, der Tausende das Leben kostete und rund 150 000 Menschen zu Flüchtlingen machte.

"Verbrannte Erde" nennt die Regierung ihre vor einem Monat begonnene militärische Offensive. Sie soll die al-Huthis, so Präsident Saleh, "ausrotten, wo und wie auch immer". Die "Terroristen" wollten die Regierung stürzen und eine Herrschaft unter einem schiitischen Führer (Imam) errichten. Dabei würden sie aus dem Iran und dem Irak unterstützt. "Wir können zwar nicht offiziell den Iran beschuldigen", sagte Jemens Präsident, "aber die Iraner haben uns angeboten zu vermitteln, also müssen sie Kontakte zu den Rebellen haben." Ähnlich verhalte es sich mit Muktada al-Sadr, dem radikalen Schiitenführer aus dem Irak, der sich ebenfalls als Mediator zur Verfügung gestellt habe. Clanführer Abdelmalik al-Huthi wehrt sich: "Wir verteidigen nur unsere kulturelle Identität gegen Diskriminierung, Marginalisierung und Ausgrenzung." Fast 24 Millionen Menschen leben im Jemen, etwa 30 Prozent gehören zum al-Huthi-Clan.

Bis zur Gründung der Republik Jemen 1962 war das Land von einem Imam als Staatoberhaupt regiert worden. 1000 Jahre stand das Land unter der Domäne des Stammes der Zaiditen, zu dem der Al-Huthi-Clan gehört. Zaiditen sind eine schiitische Sekte, die nicht wie im Iran an zwölf Imame glaubt, sondern nur fünf anerkennt. Zudem lehnt sie den Führungsanspruch des iranischen geistlichen Führers Ali Chamenei als Groß-Ayatollah ab. Eine fundamentale Diskrepanz, die es unwahrscheinlich macht, dass die Islamische Republik die jemenitischen Rebellen unterstützt.

"Niemand weiß genau, woher die al-Huthi ihr Geld bekommen", sagt Nadia al-Sakaf, Chefredakteurin der "Yemen Times". "Es gibt Spekulationen, dass sie von einflussreichen Gruppen der jemenitischen Gesellschaft unterstützt werden." Dazu gehöre Ali Mushin al-Ahmar. "Er ist der Halbbruder des Präsidenten, Militärkommandeur von Nordwestjemen, bekannt für seine extremen religiösen Ansichten und seine Beziehungen zu al-Qaida." Al-Ahmar sei für das Training von Dschihadisten im Jemen verantwortlich, bevor sie nach Afghanistan und in den Irak gehen.

Es sei auch sehr leicht, sich direkt bei der jemenitischen Armee zu bedienen. Im Korruptionsindex von Transparency International rangiert der Jemen auf Platz 141 von 180 Ländern. "Die Soldaten verkaufen Nahrungsmittel, Gewehre oder sogar Panzer", meint al-Sakaf. "Ihr Sold ist miserabel, und die Armut im Land ist groß." 40 Prozent aller Jemeniten leben von weniger als zwei Dollar pro Tag. 70 Prozent haben keine Ausbildung und keine medizinische Versorgung. Die Inflationsrate beträgt 27 Prozent. Die ökonomische Schieflage wird von rund 800 000 Flüchtlingen verstärkt, zumeist aus Somalia, die vor dem Bürgerkrieg geflohen sind.

Hinzu kommen politische Querelen durch eine Sezessionsbewegung im Süden des Landes, die die Wiedervereinigung mit dem Norden von 1990 rückgängig und einen unabhängigen Staat gründen möchte. Demonstranten forderten zuletzt "die Revolution". Nasser Mansour Hadi, politischer Sicherheitschef und Bruder des Vizepräsidenten, überlebte einen Anschlag nur knapp. "Die Einwohner im Süden wurden zu Menschen zweiter Klasse degradiert, politisch und sozial", erklärt Abdallah al-Faqih, Politikwissenschaftler der Universität Sanaa. "Nun wollen sie alles zurück."

Die panarabische Zeitung "al-Hayat" ließ Arabia Felix in einer Karikatur bereits über eine Klippe fallen. Ein Jemen am Abgrund bereitet nicht nur dem Nachbarstaat Saudi-Arabien, sondern auch den USA Sorgen. Al-Qaida könnte den Zerfall des jemenitischen Staates nutzen. Nach der erfolgreichen Zerschlagung des Terrornetzwerks in Saudi-Arabien wurde der Jemen zum Rückzugsgebiet der militanten Islamisten. Wie einst in Afghanistan gibt es auch im Jemen Verbindungen zwischen al-Qaida und staatlichen Institutionen. Die gehen auf den Bürgerkrieg gegen die sozialistische Sezessionsbewegung 1994 zurück. Damals kämpften Islamisten Seite an Seite mit den Soldaten der Regierungsarmee.

US-Präsident Barack Obama weigert sich, die 100 verbliebenen jemenitischen Gefangenen in Guantánamo in ihr Heimatland zu überstellen, obwohl er damit der angekündigten Schließung des Hochsicherheitstraktes auf Kuba einen entscheidenden Schritt näher käme. In Einklang mit Saudi-Arabien sollen die Jemeniten zuerst ein Rehabilitationsprogramm im saudischen Königreich durchlaufen, in dem schon über 100 andere Islamisten erfolgreich therapiert wurden.

US-Geheimdienstdirektor Dennis Blair sagte vor dem Kongress, der Jemen entwickele sich "zu einem Schlachtfeld der Dschihadisten und zur Basis für al-Qaida". "Das kann gut möglich sein", meint Nadia al-Sakaf und fürchtet noch Schlimmeres als im Irak oder Afghanistan: "Wir sind bewaffnet, Analphabeten, hungrig und arm."

Donnerstag, 30. Juli 2009

King Cool

Vor zehn Jahren wurde Mohammed VI. König von Marokko. Er gilt als reformfreudiger Bürgerkönig. Doch der Weg zu einer liberalen Gesellschaft ist noch weit

Zuletzt noch den Marmorboden shampooniert, den schmiedeeisernen Zaun in den Nationalfarben Grün-Rot verkleidet und draußen auf der Straße die Bordsteine neu gestrichen. Die pompösen Festzelte hatte man bereits vor über einer Woche aufgestellt. Wie immer muss zum "Fête du trone", alles perfekt sein, insbesondere zum 10. Jubiläum, das Mohammed VI. heute nicht in der Hauptstadt Rabat, sondern in seinem geliebten Tanger feiert. In einem relativ kleinen Palast im Stadtteil Marshan, von dem man die Meerenge von Gibraltar überblickt. Ganz in Weiß gekleidet, reitet dann der Herrscher der Alawiten auf einem Pferd - begleitet von einem Diener, der ihm einen Sonnenschirm über den Kopf hält - durch die Elite seiner Untertanen: eine Mischung aus islamischen Theologen, Ministern, Abgeordneten und Behördenbediensteten. Sich verbeugend, schwören sie ihrem König Gehorsam.

Altertümliche Traditionen, die eigentlich nicht zum öffentlichen Image von Mohammed VI. passen. Als er 1999, nach dem Tod seiner Vaters Hassan II., die Regentschaft übernahm, galt der damals 36-Jährige als "cooler King". Bekannt war sein Faible für Jetski, Sportwagen, Raï-Pop und die Freundschaft zu US-Rapper P. Diddy oder dem französischen Altrocker Johnny Hallyday. Ein Image, das sich der Monarch bis heute auch etwas kosten lässt. Alleine für den Unterhalt seines Fuhrparks, vornehmlich Ferraris und Mercedes, soll er jährlich sechs Millionen ausgeben, wie das marokkanische Wochenmagazin "Telquel" errechnete. Mohammed VI. kann sich das leisten, zählt er doch zu den 15 reichsten "Royals" der Welt. Das US-Wirtschaftsmagazin "Forbes" setzte ihn 2008 auf Position sieben in der Rangliste, noch vor den Emiren aus Katar und Kuwait. Geschätztes Vermögen des marokkanischen Königs: 2,5 Milliarden Dollar. Fünf Mal so viel, wie ihm sein Vater Hassan II. vor zehn Jahren hinterlassen hatte.

Diesen unermesslichen Reichtum in einem Land, in dem laut CIA Factbook 15 Prozent der Bevölkerung unter der Armutsgrenze leben, nimmt ihm jedoch kaum jemand übel. "Selbst wenn es nicht gerecht ist", meint Said Naji, 34-jähriger Manager einer deutschen Firma in Marokko. "Das gehört zu einem König." Viel wichtiger sei es jedoch, dass im Vergleich zu früher alles wesentlich besser wurde. "Mit Mohammed VI. kam mehr Freiheit, und mit unserer Ökonomie geht es aufwärts."

Tatsächlich brachte der neue Regent, als er 1999 den Thron bestieg, Marokko auf Reformkurs. Als eine seiner ersten Amtshandlungen veranlasste er die Entlassung von Tausenden von politischen Gefangenen, bat im Exil Lebende persönlich zurückzukommen, und vertraute ihnen Aufgaben bei der Neugestaltung des Landes an. Zudem wurde eine "Wahrheits- und Versöhnungskommission" initiiert, die die Menschenrechtsverletzungen der "bleiernen Zeit" (1956-1999) unter Hassan II. aufarbeitete. Den Vorsitz bekam Driss Benzekri, ein ehemaliger kommunistischer Häftling. Die Anhörungen dieser Kommission wurden live im nationalen Fernsehen übertragen. "Im Vergleich zu anderen arabischen Ländern", meint Abdelhay Moudden, Politikwissenschaftler und ehemaliges Mitglied der Wahrheitskommission, "war das marokkanische Vorgehen ein unglaublicher Schritt. Keiner der Machthaber in Ägypten, Saudi-Arabien oder Syrien würde eine derartige Kommission bei sich dulden."

Ein weiterer Meilenstein war 2004 ein neues Familiengesetz (Moudawana), das der Frau wesentlich mehr Rechte als zuvor einräumt und für andere arabische Länder revolutionär ist. Für Prinzessin Lalla Salma, die Frau von Mohammed VI., "eine Grundvoraussetzung für die Bildung einer demokratischen Gesellschaft". 2002 hatte die damals 24-jährige studierte Informatikerin den marokkanischen Monarchen geheiratet. Als erste Ehefrau eines Königs in der Geschichte Marokkos wurde sie der Öffentlichkeit präsentiert - und das ohne Schleier und Kopftuch, versteht sich. Die Prinzessin engagiert sich für den Kampf gegen Krebs und Aids, spricht als Repräsentantin Marokkos in Paris vor der Unesco-Generalkonferenz oder bei einem Treffen der Arabischen Frauen-Organisation in Tunis. Ein deutliches Signal, wie sich das Königshaus eine moderne Frau in einem liberalen Marokko vorstellt.

Parallel zum politischen Reformkurs wurden die Infrastruktur Marokkos ausgebaut und wirtschaftliche Großprojekte gestartet. Heute verbindet ein 1500 Kilometer langes Autobahnnetz (unter Hassan II. waren es 100 Kilometer) alle größeren marokkanischen Städte. Eine Schnellzugverbindung mit französischen TGV-Lokomotiven ist in Planung. In der Nähe von Tanger entstand für über eine Milliarde Euro ein neuer Mittelmeerhafen. Dazu eine 500-Quadratkilometer-Industriezone, in der Renault ab 2013 jedes Jahr 200 000 neue Autos produzieren will.

"Die Veränderungen seit dem Beginn der Regentschaft von Mohammed VI. sind enorm", glaubt Khalid Amine, Professor an der Universität in Tetouan. "Sie beschränken sich nicht nur auf Politik und Ökonomie, sondern sind auch sozialer Natur." Damit meint er die Alphabetisierungsprogramme für die rund 40 Prozent Marokkaner, die nicht lesen und schreiben können, sowie die Einführung einer medizinischen Basisversorgung der armen Schichten, die sich keinen Arzt leisten können. Oder auch das Programm zur Beseitigung von Elendsvierteln. Bisher sind 30 Städte für "slumfrei" erklärt worden. Bis Ende 2009 sollen weitere 50 000 dieser Hüttendörfer verschwinden und deren Bewohner in Neubauten umgesiedelt werden. Die Maßnahmen in den urbanen Randgebieten haben allerdings nicht nur soziale Motive. Die Attentäter der Bombenanschläge in Casablanca vom Mai 2003, bei denen 43 Menschen starben, kamen aus derartigen urbanen Elendsquartieren. Mit dem Ende dieser Viertel will man den radikalen Islamisten eine Rekrutierungsbasis nehmen.

Die Bomben von Casablanca gelten als eine Zäsur auf dem Weg der Liberalisierung Marokkos. Nur elf Tage nach den Anschlägen in Casablanca wurde vom Parlament eine Verschärfung des Anti-Terror-Gesetzes verabschiedet. Menschenrechtsorganisationen protestierten scharf gegen die Gesetzesänderung, die Terrorismus wesentlich weiter fasst und die Todesstrafe für eine größere Anzahl von Delikten vorschreibt. Bis heute enttarnten die marokkanischen Behörden über 50 angebliche Terrornetze militanter Islamisten, die Attentate im In- und Ausland geplant haben sollen. Unter Hassan II. bevölkerten Kommunisten als Systemgegner marokkanische Gefängnisse, heute sind es die Islamisten.

In den letzten Jahren gab es auch immer wieder Verhaftungen und Verurteilungen von Journalisten. Sogar ein Jugendlicher, der "Gott, Nation und FC Barcelona (statt König)" an die Schultafel geschrieben hatte, war von den Behörden in Gewahrsam genommen worden. "Mit insgesamt 25 Jahren Haft und zwei Millionen Euro Geldstrafe sind Journalisten in den letzten zehn Jahren in Marokko bestraft worden", heißt es in einem Bericht von Reporter ohne Grenzen. Wobei allerdings nicht gesagt wird, dass einige Strafen in zweiter Instanz entscheidend reduziert oder sogar aufgehoben wurden.

Nach 38 Jahren Diktatur unter Hassan II. haben einige seiner Anhänger noch nicht begriffen, dass diese rigide Ära vorbei ist. "Natürlich ist Marokko noch keine Demokratie, aber es befindet sich auf dem Weg dazu, obwohl dies einige immer wieder zu verhindern versuchen", erklärt Abdelhay Moudden. "Die Gruppe der Liberalisierungsgegner, die hinter den Kulissen sabotiert, ist sehr heterogen. Dazu gehören konservative Monarchisten im Justizwesen oder in anderen Teilen der Staatsbürokratie. Aber auch Industrielle und säkulare Militärs, die den althergebrachten Status quo verteidigen." Man brauche mehr Reformen, vor allen Dingen eine Überarbeitung des Strafgesetzbuchs, damit keine Verstöße gegen die Meinungsfreiheit mehr möglich sind. "Aber nach wie vor", fügt Moudden schmunzelnd hinzu, "kann man sich als Marokkaner, im Vergleich zu anderen arabischen Ländern, immer noch ziemlich gut fühlen."

King Cool

Vor zehn Jahren wurde Mohammed VI. König von Marokko. Er gilt als reformfreudiger Bürgerkönig. Doch der Weg zu einer liberalen Gesellschaft ist noch weit

Zuletzt noch den Marmorboden shampooniert, den schmiedeeisernen Zaun in den Nationalfarben Grün-Rot verkleidet und draußen auf der Straße die Bordsteine neu gestrichen. Die pompösen Festzelte hatte man bereits vor über einer Woche aufgestellt. Wie immer muss zum "Fête du trone", alles perfekt sein, insbesondere zum 10. Jubiläum, das Mohammed VI. heute nicht in der Hauptstadt Rabat, sondern in seinem geliebten Tanger feiert. In einem relativ kleinen Palast im Stadtteil Marshan, von dem man die Meerenge von Gibraltar überblickt. Ganz in Weiß gekleidet, reitet dann der Herrscher der Alawiten auf einem Pferd - begleitet von einem Diener, der ihm einen Sonnenschirm über den Kopf hält - durch die Elite seiner Untertanen: eine Mischung aus islamischen Theologen, Ministern, Abgeordneten und Behördenbediensteten. Sich verbeugend, schwören sie ihrem König Gehorsam.

Altertümliche Traditionen, die eigentlich nicht zum öffentlichen Image von Mohammed VI. passen. Als er 1999, nach dem Tod seiner Vaters Hassan II., die Regentschaft übernahm, galt der damals 36-Jährige als "cooler King". Bekannt war sein Faible für Jetski, Sportwagen, Raï-Pop und die Freundschaft zu US-Rapper P. Diddy oder dem französischen Altrocker Johnny Hallyday. Ein Image, das sich der Monarch bis heute auch etwas kosten lässt. Alleine für den Unterhalt seines Fuhrparks, vornehmlich Ferraris und Mercedes, soll er jährlich sechs Millionen ausgeben, wie das marokkanische Wochenmagazin "Telquel" errechnete. Mohammed VI. kann sich das leisten, zählt er doch zu den 15 reichsten "Royals" der Welt. Das US-Wirtschaftsmagazin "Forbes" setzte ihn 2008 auf Position sieben in der Rangliste, noch vor den Emiren aus Katar und Kuwait. Geschätztes Vermögen des marokkanischen Königs: 2,5 Milliarden Dollar. Fünf Mal so viel, wie ihm sein Vater Hassan II. vor zehn Jahren hinterlassen hatte.

Diesen unermesslichen Reichtum in einem Land, in dem laut CIA Factbook 15 Prozent der Bevölkerung unter der Armutsgrenze leben, nimmt ihm jedoch kaum jemand übel. "Selbst wenn es nicht gerecht ist", meint Said Naji, 34-jähriger Manager einer deutschen Firma in Marokko. "Das gehört zu einem König." Viel wichtiger sei es jedoch, dass im Vergleich zu früher alles wesentlich besser wurde. "Mit Mohammed VI. kam mehr Freiheit, und mit unserer Ökonomie geht es aufwärts."

Tatsächlich brachte der neue Regent, als er 1999 den Thron bestieg, Marokko auf Reformkurs. Als eine seiner ersten Amtshandlungen veranlasste er die Entlassung von Tausenden von politischen Gefangenen, bat im Exil Lebende persönlich zurückzukommen, und vertraute ihnen Aufgaben bei der Neugestaltung des Landes an. Zudem wurde eine "Wahrheits- und Versöhnungskommission" initiiert, die die Menschenrechtsverletzungen der "bleiernen Zeit" (1956-1999) unter Hassan II. aufarbeitete. Den Vorsitz bekam Driss Benzekri, ein ehemaliger kommunistischer Häftling. Die Anhörungen dieser Kommission wurden live im nationalen Fernsehen übertragen. "Im Vergleich zu anderen arabischen Ländern", meint Abdelhay Moudden, Politikwissenschaftler und ehemaliges Mitglied der Wahrheitskommission, "war das marokkanische Vorgehen ein unglaublicher Schritt. Keiner der Machthaber in Ägypten, Saudi-Arabien oder Syrien würde eine derartige Kommission bei sich dulden."

Ein weiterer Meilenstein war 2004 ein neues Familiengesetz (Moudawana), das der Frau wesentlich mehr Rechte als zuvor einräumt und für andere arabische Länder revolutionär ist. Für Prinzessin Lalla Salma, die Frau von Mohammed VI., "eine Grundvoraussetzung für die Bildung einer demokratischen Gesellschaft". 2002 hatte die damals 24-jährige studierte Informatikerin den marokkanischen Monarchen geheiratet. Als erste Ehefrau eines Königs in der Geschichte Marokkos wurde sie der Öffentlichkeit präsentiert - und das ohne Schleier und Kopftuch, versteht sich. Die Prinzessin engagiert sich für den Kampf gegen Krebs und Aids, spricht als Repräsentantin Marokkos in Paris vor der Unesco-Generalkonferenz oder bei einem Treffen der Arabischen Frauen-Organisation in Tunis. Ein deutliches Signal, wie sich das Königshaus eine moderne Frau in einem liberalen Marokko vorstellt.

Parallel zum politischen Reformkurs wurden die Infrastruktur Marokkos ausgebaut und wirtschaftliche Großprojekte gestartet. Heute verbindet ein 1500 Kilometer langes Autobahnnetz (unter Hassan II. waren es 100 Kilometer) alle größeren marokkanischen Städte. Eine Schnellzugverbindung mit französischen TGV-Lokomotiven ist in Planung. In der Nähe von Tanger entstand für über eine Milliarde Euro ein neuer Mittelmeerhafen. Dazu eine 500-Quadratkilometer-Industriezone, in der Renault ab 2013 jedes Jahr 200 000 neue Autos produzieren will.

"Die Veränderungen seit dem Beginn der Regentschaft von Mohammed VI. sind enorm", glaubt Khalid Amine, Professor an der Universität in Tetouan. "Sie beschränken sich nicht nur auf Politik und Ökonomie, sondern sind auch sozialer Natur." Damit meint er die Alphabetisierungsprogramme für die rund 40 Prozent Marokkaner, die nicht lesen und schreiben können, sowie die Einführung einer medizinischen Basisversorgung der armen Schichten, die sich keinen Arzt leisten können. Oder auch das Programm zur Beseitigung von Elendsvierteln. Bisher sind 30 Städte für "slumfrei" erklärt worden. Bis Ende 2009 sollen weitere 50 000 dieser Hüttendörfer verschwinden und deren Bewohner in Neubauten umgesiedelt werden. Die Maßnahmen in den urbanen Randgebieten haben allerdings nicht nur soziale Motive. Die Attentäter der Bombenanschläge in Casablanca vom Mai 2003, bei denen 43 Menschen starben, kamen aus derartigen urbanen Elendsquartieren. Mit dem Ende dieser Viertel will man den radikalen Islamisten eine Rekrutierungsbasis nehmen.

Die Bomben von Casablanca gelten als eine Zäsur auf dem Weg der Liberalisierung Marokkos. Nur elf Tage nach den Anschlägen in Casablanca wurde vom Parlament eine Verschärfung des Anti-Terror-Gesetzes verabschiedet. Menschenrechtsorganisationen protestierten scharf gegen die Gesetzesänderung, die Terrorismus wesentlich weiter fasst und die Todesstrafe für eine größere Anzahl von Delikten vorschreibt. Bis heute enttarnten die marokkanischen Behörden über 50 angebliche Terrornetze militanter Islamisten, die Attentate im In- und Ausland geplant haben sollen. Unter Hassan II. bevölkerten Kommunisten als Systemgegner marokkanische Gefängnisse, heute sind es die Islamisten.

In den letzten Jahren gab es auch immer wieder Verhaftungen und Verurteilungen von Journalisten. Sogar ein Jugendlicher, der "Gott, Nation und FC Barcelona (statt König)" an die Schultafel geschrieben hatte, war von den Behörden in Gewahrsam genommen worden. "Mit insgesamt 25 Jahren Haft und zwei Millionen Euro Geldstrafe sind Journalisten in den letzten zehn Jahren in Marokko bestraft worden", heißt es in einem Bericht von Reporter ohne Grenzen. Wobei allerdings nicht gesagt wird, dass einige Strafen in zweiter Instanz entscheidend reduziert oder sogar aufgehoben wurden.

Nach 38 Jahren Diktatur unter Hassan II. haben einige seiner Anhänger noch nicht begriffen, dass diese rigide Ära vorbei ist. "Natürlich ist Marokko noch keine Demokratie, aber es befindet sich auf dem Weg dazu, obwohl dies einige immer wieder zu verhindern versuchen", erklärt Abdelhay Moudden. "Die Gruppe der Liberalisierungsgegner, die hinter den Kulissen sabotiert, ist sehr heterogen. Dazu gehören konservative Monarchisten im Justizwesen oder in anderen Teilen der Staatsbürokratie. Aber auch Industrielle und säkulare Militärs, die den althergebrachten Status quo verteidigen." Man brauche mehr Reformen, vor allen Dingen eine Überarbeitung des Strafgesetzbuchs, damit keine Verstöße gegen die Meinungsfreiheit mehr möglich sind. "Aber nach wie vor", fügt Moudden schmunzelnd hinzu, "kann man sich als Marokkaner, im Vergleich zu anderen arabischen Ländern, immer noch ziemlich gut fühlen."

Mittwoch, 13. Mai 2009

Naked Lunch: In Zimmer Nummer neun

Fünfzig Jahre nach der Erstveröffentlichung des Klassikers der Beatgeneration erscheint eine deutsche Neuausgabe. In Tanger, wo William S. Burroughs sein Buch schrieb, ist heute von der damaligen Atmosphäre nicht mehr viel zu spüren.

William S. Burroughs würde sich wohl im Grabe umdrehen, bei den Kids, die sich jedes Wochenende im «TangerInn» treffen, bevor sie für den Rest der Nacht in die schicken Clubs am Strand der marokkanischen Hafenstadt verschwinden. Verwöhnte, neureiche Jugendliche: Vom Papa ein Auto zum Geburtstag, das Frühstück vom Hausmädchen und teure Privatschule sind die Eckpfeiler ihrer Welt. Dass einige von ihnen auf der Toilette der Bar Koks schnupfen, wäre da für Burroughs wenig tröstlich. Eher schon die Stricher unter den Gäs­ten, die mit ihrem unverwechselbar unschuldigen, breiten Lächeln nach europäischer Kundschaft Ausschau halten. Ein Stück homosexueller Dissidenz in einem Heer von heterosexueller Mittelmässigkeit. Aber auch diese jungen Männer wüssten nicht, wer William S. Burroughs ist, selbst wenn er sie (vorausgesetzt sie sind jung genug) anspräche. Grosse Fotos von ihm und Allen Ginsberg, der anderen Ikone der Beatgeneration, hängen an den Wänden, aber für die Geschichte des Hauses interessiert sich hier bei lauter Musik und viel Alkohol niemand.

Das «TangerInn» gehört zur Pension Muniria, die unmittelbar darüber liegt. Ein kleines Hotel, mit nur wenigen Zimmern in der Neustadt von Tanger, an einem Hügel zum Hafen hin. Von den oberen Stockwerken hat man einen wunderbaren Blick nach Spanien auf die andere Seite der Meerenge von Gibraltar. Nur darauf legte William S. Burroughs keinen Wert, als er von 1954 bis 1956 im «Muniria» wohnte und am Manuskript von «Naked Lunch» arbeitete. Ein Roman, der heute als Klassiker der US-amerikanischen Literaturgeschichte gilt und weltweit insgesamt über eine Million Mal verkauft wurde.

Toleranz gehörte zum guten Ton

Burroughs residierte im Souterrain, im Zimmer Nummer neun mit Zugang zu einem kleinen, von einer hohen Mauer umgebenen Garten, aus dem heute immer noch die von alten Fotos bekannte grosse Palme ragt. «Nein, nein, Interesse hatte der weder am Garten noch an der Terrasse», erzählte mir 1991 John, der Besitzer der Pension Muniria, kurz vor seinem Tod. «Die Fensterläden waren fast immer geschlossen, ein ruhiger Mieter, von dem man oft nicht wusste, ob er zu Hause oder unterwegs war.» Sutcliff, ehemaliger Offizier der britischen Armee in Indien, hatte sich das Hotelgebäude mit seiner Abfindung von der Armee gekauft. Er wusste natürlich von den Drogengewohnheiten seines ungewöhnlichen Mieters, aber Toleranz gehörte zum guten Ton in diesen Tagen. «Wissen Sie, damals war Tanger noch eine internationale Zone, in der man als Westler so ziemlich alles machen konnte, was man wollte. Das gehörte einfach zu dieser Stadt.»

Burroughs, der Harvard-Absolvent und Industriellensohn aus dem Hause Burroughs Adding Machine, schrieb in seinem verdunkelten Zimmer monomanisch an seinen Routines, seinen literarischen Improvisationen. Im ers­ten Jahr noch unter dem Einfluss von Opiaten wie Eukodol, einem deutschen Pharmaprodukt. Monatelang will der US-Autor, nach eigenen Aussagen, kein Bad genommen, geschweige denn die Kleider gewechselt haben. «Nur jede Stunde kurz Hemd oder Hose ausgezogen, um eine Nadel ins Fleisch zu bohren.» Er tat absolut nichts und konnte «acht Stunden lang die Schuhspitzen anschauen».

Nach einer Entziehungskur in London, die Burroughs mit 500 Dollar von seinen wohlhabenden Eltern finanzierte, ging es in Tanger weiter mit Marjoun, einer traditionellen marokkanischen Haschischmarmelade. Eine starke Paste, die gewöhnlich auch für psychedelische Eingebungen sorgt. Nicht ganz unverständlich, sagte Burroughs Jahre später, er wisse gar nicht, wie sein Roman zustande gekommen sei.

Arbeiten im Schichtdienst

Einen vollständigen Aufschluss über die Entstehungsgeschichte von «Naked Lunch» gibt nun eine neue deutsche Ausgabe des Romans im Verlag Nagel und Kimche, die zum 50. Jubiläum der Erstveröffentlichung (1959 bei Olympia Press in Paris) erschienen ist. Zum Originaltext, von Michael Kellner neu übersetzt und dem trockenen, schnurrigen Ton Burroughs mehr Rechnung tragend, werden bisher auf Deutsch unveröffentlichte Textvarianten, Briefe des US-Autors und ein ausführliches Nachwort zur Entstehungsgeschichte geliefert. Man erfährt, dass Burroughs nicht der einzige Autor des Buches ist. Seine Freunde Allen Ginsberg, Allen Ansen und Jack Kerouac mussten in einen unübersichtlichen Wust von Mauskripten, Notizen und Briefen erst Ordnung bringen, bevor ein Buch entstehen konnte. «Wir bearbeiten riesige Mengen von Material im Schichtdienst, geben auch Sachen zum Abtippen weg, ein Teil von 120 Seiten abgeschlossen», schreibt Allen Ginsberg in der dritten Maiwoche 1957 in einem Brief an Lucian Carr. «Nun kommt der härtere Teil des Jobs, seine Briefe von 1953 bis1956 durchgehen und das Material integrieren, Autobiographisches, Routines und Erzählfragmente. Richtige Arbeit - wir ackern sechs Stunden oder mehr am Tag, blödeln rum, trinken, abends koche ich grosse Mahlzeiten.»

In Tanger entsteht so das erste Urmanuskript von «Naked Lunch», das von den Freunden danach in Venedig und in Paris für die Ausgabe der Olympia Press noch mehrfach überarbeitet wird. Darunter auch Brion Gysin, der als Begründer der Cut-up-Technik gilt, einer literarischen Methode, bei der verschiedene Texte neu zusammengesetzt werden und die auch in Burroughs Buch seinen Niederschlag findet.

«Naked Lunch» erzählt die Geschichten des Agenten William Lee, des Doktor Benway und der sprechenden Fantasiekreaturen Burroughs, den Mugwumps; die Geschichten spielen in den USA, Mexiko und Tanger. Dabei werden wild Perspektiven gewechselt und bewusst die sonst üblichen linearen Erzählstrukturen gebrochen. Das Buch beschreibt jedoch gleichzeitig auch das Ende des «Welt allmächtigen Autors», der alleine, in sich zurückgezogen, im kreativen Elfenbeinturm seine Literatur «erschafft».

Die neue Welt der Subkultur

«Naked Lunch» ist so sehr ein Produkt von Burroughs wie auch der Gruppe von Freunden, zu der er gehört, die ändern, kürzen, auswählen, weglassen und umschreiben. Ein kollektiver Prozess, der in dieser Form nur durch ein verbindendes Sendungsbewusstsein möglich war. In den vierziger Jahren hatten sich die angehenden Schriftsteller in New York gefunden. Nach dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs waren sie dort auf der Suche nach einem vollkommen neuen Menschentypus, wie auch nach einer nicht weniger revolutionären Literatur. Zuerst fanden sie den Stricher, Dieb und Junkie Herbert Huncke in der Gegend der 42. Strasse, rund um den Times Square. Von ihm liessen sich die jungen Grünschnäbel die Sprache und Kultur des Undergrounds lehren. Er machte sie mit den Jazzclubs in Harlem vertraut, zu denen Weisse normalerweise keinen Zutritt hatten, gab Burroughs seinen ersten, wegweisenden Schuss und versorgte auch die anderen mit Drogen.

Nach der Initiation in die neue Welt der Subkultur der Strasse folgte die neue Literatur, die die gängigen Schemas über den Haufen warf. Man nannte sich «The Beat Generation», ein Begriff, den Jack Kerouac basierend auf Herbert Hunckes «I Am Beat» kreierte. Bekannteste Werke der Beatgeneration werden das Gedicht «Howl» (1956) von Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouacs «On the Road» (geschrieben 1951, veröffentlicht 1957) und später eben Burroughs› «Naked Lunch» (1959). Bei aller Mithilfe Dritter ist es einzigartig im bösen wie trockenen Ton und beinhaltet dunkle pornografische Darstellungen des Autors. Jack Kerouac war vor Erscheinen des Buches 1957 bereits überzeugt, dass Burroughs «das grossartigste Buch seit Jean Genets ‹Notre Dame des Fleurs› geschrieben» habe.

«Schweizer Uhren, Scotch, Sex»

John Sutcliff, der vormalige Besitzer der Pension Muniria, erinnerte sich noch gut an die jungen «Beats», die zuerst 1957 und später noch mal 1961 (für die US-Ausgabe von «Naked Lunch») in seinem Haus Manuskripte abtippten. «Da gab es auch einen Kerl, ich glaube, der hiess Gregory Corso und fiel im ‹TangerInn› immer wieder vom Stuhl. Ich fragte ihn, was los sei, worauf er mir empfahl, ich sollte auch mal auf einen Trip gehen. Ich erwiderte ihm, was auch immer mit Trip gemeint sei, für mich ist das nichts, mich immer wieder auf dem Fussboden wälzen zu müssen.» Sonst seien alle jungen Männer höflich, zuvorkommend und nett gewesen, fügte der an den Händen zitternde alte Mann hinzu.

1953 war Burroughs zum ersten Mal nach Tanger, in die «weisse Stadt» an der Meerenge von Gibraltar gereist. Zwei Jahre zuvor hatte er im Suff seine Frau in Mexiko-Stadt bei einem Wilhelm-Tell-Spiel erschossen. Er suchte nun einen Ort, an dem er endlich zur Ruhe kommen konnte. Die «internationale Zone» Tanger schien für den damals 39-Jährigen perfekt zu sein. Haschisch wurde auf der Strasse geraucht, harte Drogen gab es in der Apotheke ohne Rezept, die Polizei hielt sich bei allem möglichst im Hintergrund, Homosexualität und auch Päderastie schienen hier völlig normal zu sein. Für alle nur erdenklichen sexuellen Präferenzen gab es nicht nur massenhaft Prostituierte, die sich anboten, sondern auch Bordelle, die völlig unbehelligt betrieben wurden. Bevor Burroughs in die Pension Muniria einzog, wohnte er in der Calle de los Arcos Nummer eins, sehr praktisch, direkt über einem dieser Freudenhäuser für Männer. Einer der dort arbeitenden jugendlichen Stricher, Kiki, wurde sein ständiger Begleiter.

«In Tanger gibt es diese Weltuntergangsstimmung», liest man in einem der zahlreichen Briefe Burroughs an Allen Ginsberg, «mit der Flut von Nylonhemden, Schweizer Uhren, Scotch und Sex und Opiaten, die über den Ladentisch verkauft werden. Das Böse ist hier laissez faire.»

Eine Mischung, die damals auch viele andere Künstler anzog. Neben Paul Bowles und seiner Frau Jane, Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote, Francis Bacon oder auch Brion Gysin, um nur einige wenige zu nennen. Allerdings hatte William S. Burroughs keinen Kontakt zu ihnen. Sie bevorzugten die Gesellschaft der Hautevolee Tangers, schicke Restaurants, Bars und mondäne Partys, von denen es täglich einige zu besuchen gab.

Der ungewaschene Junkie Burroughs galt mit einem monatlichen 200-Dollar-Scheck seiner Eltern als minderbemittelt, hauste in einer schäbigen Pension und kannte, ausser Apothekern, Dealern und Liebhabern, kaum jemanden. «Eine Schriftstellerkolonie gibt es nicht», schrieb der heutige Grandseigneur des Underground und der Avantgarde an seinen Freund Allen Ginsberg in New York. «Wenn ja, dann leben sie irgendwo im Verborgenen.» Der erste Kontakt mit Paul Bowles, der bis zu seinem Tod 1999 in Tanger blieb, kam erst 1961 zustande, zwei Jahre nach der Pariser Erstveröffentlichung von «Naked Lunch». Man traf sich im Hotel Muniria, zusammen mit den anderen Beats.

Der unsichtbare Mann

Bei seinem Aufenthalt in den fünfziger Jahren war Burroughs trotz seiner sexuellen Abenteuer ein einsamer Mann, der scheinbar unsichtbar durch die Strassen und Gassen Tangers schlich. Nicht umsonst nannte man ihn «el hombre invisible» (den unsichtbaren Mann). Zu Gesicht bekam man ihn manchmal in einem der Cafés von Tanger. Darunter das Café Hafa im Stadtteil Marshan. Dort sass er an einem der heute immer noch wackligen, blau gestrichenen Holztische, rauchte Kif (Marihuana), trank Tee, notierte oder schrieb Briefe an Allen Ginsberg. Auf den unzähligen kleinen Terrassen des direkt über den Klippen des Mittelmeers gelegenen Cafés konnte er leicht ein ungestörtes Plätzchen finden. Heute treffen sich dort tagsüber nur mehr Studentinnen und Schüler, die auf die vorbeifahrenden Schiffe und die Küste Spaniens starren. Seltsame Typen wie William S. Burroughs sieht man hier kaum noch.

Die Wochenzeitung vom 07.05.2009

Sonntag, 5. April 2009

Wie die Finanzkrise dem Koran hilft

Der Ruf nach schariagerechtem Islamic Banking in der arabischen Welt wird durch den Kollaps der Märkte lauter

Ob Rocksänger Rod Stewart, Fußballstar David Beckham oder das Baywatch-Busenwunder Pamela Anderson - wer etwas auf sich hielt und die nötigen Millionen hatte, kaufte sich in Dubai ein luxuriöses Heim. Wie in keinem anderen Land prosperiert am persischen Golf der Baumarkt, den architektonischen Fantasien waren kaum Grenzen gesetzt. Mit der internationalen Finanzkrise ist es damit nun erst einmal vorbei. Mehr als die Hälfte aller Bauvorhaben (Gesamtwert: 582 Milliarden Dollar) sind in den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten eingefroren. Auch die Nachbarländer traf die Krise hart. Die Börse von Kuwait fiel um 57 Prozent im Vergleich zum Juni 2008. Insgesamt sollen Investoren aus der Golfregion rund 2,5 Billionen Dollar verloren haben, schätzt die Union der Arabischen Wirtschaftskammer.

Für Nasser Saidi vom Internationalen Finanzzentrum in Dubai ist dies die perfekte Gelegenheit, islamische Finanzmodelle anzuwenden. "Sie bieten eine bessere Haftung, mehr Transparenz und statt schnellem Profit such man nach langfristigen Finanzierungen." Der Chefökonom aus Dubai spricht vom "Islamic Banking", das auf der Scharia basiert.

Ein System, das damit arbeitende Banken vor großen Verlusten bewahrte: Kreditgeschäfte, Hypotheken, Optionen, Futures, Derivate - alles, was die Krise in den USA auslöste, ist im Islamic Banking verboten. "Wir sind nicht von Bonds und Aktien abhängig", erklärt Adnan Ahmed Jussef, Vorsitzender der Union Arabischer Banken. "Wir sind auch nicht, wie die meisten Banken, daran beteiligt, Schulden zu kaufen und zu verkaufen."

Schon Prophet Mohammed war Kaufmann, und Handeln ist für gläubige Muslime ein gottgefälliger Beruf. Nur Zinsen dürfen nicht erhoben werden. Zudem keine Beteiligung am Glücksspiel, Schweinefleisch, Alkohol, Tabak und Prostitution. Idealerweise basiert Islamic Banking auf dem gerechten Austausch, wie es in einem Ausspruch des Propheten heißt: "Gold für Gold, Silber für Silber, Weizen für Weizen, Gerste für Gerste, Datteln für Datteln, Salz für Salz, Gleiches für Gleiches, Hand zu Hand, in gleichen Teilen; jeder Zuwachs ist 'Riba' (Zins, Wucher)."

Ein Scharia-Expertenbeirat überwacht und prüft in der Bank, was verboten (haram) und was erlaubt (halal) ist. Dazu interpretiert er den Koran. Die fast 1400 Jahre alten Texte auf moderne Sachverhalte zu prüfen, ist für die islamischen Rechtsgelehrten nicht immer so einfach, die Interpretationen können immense Auswirkungen haben. 2008 brach der Markt der islamischen Anleihen um die Hälfte ein. Vor allem "wegen der Äußerungen des gelehrten Scheichs Taki Usmani, dass 85 Prozent aller Anleihen nicht schariakonform seien", erklärt Zaid el-Mogaddedi vom Institute for Islamic Banking in Frankfurt am Main.

Trotzdem, mit Islamic Banking hätte es die Hypothekenkrise in den USA nicht gegeben. Statt Geld zu verleihen, hätten die islamischen Banken das Haus ganz oder zu 80 Prozent gekauft. Der Kunde zahlt dann jeden Monat Raten bis zur vollkommenen Tilgung. Überschusszahlungen werden nicht als Zinsen, sondern als Kompensation für die Wertsteigerungen angesehen. "Ein anderer entscheidender Faktor der Krise war der Bankhandel mit nicht vorhandenem Vermögen", sagt Steven Amos von der Islamic Bank of Britain. "Die konventionellen Banken wussten oft nicht, was sie da kauften, ob es dafür ein reales Vermögen oder Einlagen gibt. Wir dagegen müssen zuerst die Einlagen besitzen, bevor wir Geschäfte machen können". Außerdem konnte und dürfte seine Bank kein Geld an andere Institute verleihen. Kredite in Milliardenhöhe, die nicht gedeckt waren, hatten Investmentbanken wie Lehman Brothers zu Fall gebracht.

In Großbritannien gibt es heute fünf islamische Banken und weitere 20 bekannte Großbanken, die islamische Abteilungen eröffnet haben, was bei einer jährlichen Wachstumsrate von 15 Prozent verständlich ist. In Deutschland spielt das islamische Bankwesen noch eine untergeordnete Rolle, obwohl es mit etwa 3,5 Millionen Muslimen ein enormes Potenzial gäbe, sagt Mogaddedi. "Aber das deutsche Rechts- und Finanzsystem ist für die Entwicklung eines islamischen Finanzwesens nicht ausgerichtet. Politiker sind sehr vorsichtig."

Das islamische Bankwesen ist im Vergleich zur westlichen Bankgeschichte relativ jung. 1963 und 1971 gab es in Ägypten Banken, die ohne Zinsen arbeiteten, sich aber nicht ausdrücklich als islamisch bezeichneten. 1974 wurde die Islamic Development Bank - heute 55 Mitgliedsländer - gegründet. Seit 1999 gibt es zwei islamische Marktindizes, vergleichbar dem deutschen Dax. In diese Indizes werden nur Firmen aufgenommen, die schariakonform arbeiten. Wer dies nicht tut - Zinsen erhebt oder in Schweinefleisch investiert - wird nicht aufgenommen oder gegebenenfalls ausgeschlossen.

Publiziert in der Welt am 5.04.09

Geheime Mission: Weltrevolution

Von Bahrain über Marokko bis nach Nigeria - die islamische Welt fürchtet eine schiitische Infiltration durch den Iran

Brennende Autoreifen, Maskierte, die Steine und Molotowcocktails auf Polizisten werfen: Eine Straßenkampfszene, die man aus Berlin oder London kennt, aber nicht aus einem reichen Ölland wie Bahrain. Seit Wochen kommt der kleine Golfstaat nicht mehr zur Ruhe, nachdem die Polizei vergangenen Monat 23 Oppositionelle, darunter auch populäre schiitische Geistliche, verhaftete. "Nein zur Unterdrückung der Freiheit", fordert in der Hauptstadt Manama ein Graffito, das schiitische Demonstranten an einer Wand hinterließen. Sie fühlen sich von der sunnitischen Elite des Landes diskriminiert, obwohl Schiiten 70 Prozent der Bevölkerung der insgesamt 530 000 Bahrainer ausmachen.

Gewalttätige Proteste und Forderung nach Gleichberechtigung sind für die ansonsten ruhige Golfregion neu und lösten bei arabischen Staatsmännern Alarm aus. Insbesondere nach den Bemerkungen von Ali Akbar Nateq-Nouri anlässlich des 30. Jahrestags der iranischen Revolution. Der Berater von Staatsoberhaupt Ayatollah Chamenei sprach von Bahrain als "14. Provinz" des Iran, die der ehemalige Schah Reza Pahlavi 1970 einfach aufgegeben hätte. Obwohl Nateq-Nouri kurz darauf betonte, nur historische Fakten referiert zu haben und keineswegs die Souveränität Bahrains infrage stellen wollte, war die Entrüstung groß. König Abdullah von Jordanien und der ägyptische Präsident Hosni Mubarak statteten Solidaritätsbesuche beim bahrainischen Regenten al-Khalifa ab. Saudi-Arabien nannte die Worte aus dem Iran "feindlich gesinnt und unverantwortlich". Marokkos König Mohammed VI. sprach nicht nur von einem "verachtenswerten" Statement und einer "Drohung", er brach kurzerhand die diplomatischen Beziehungen zur Islamischen Republik ab. "Die Reaktionen waren überzogen", sagt Adnan Abu-Odeh, Ex-Berater des jordanischen Königs. "Aber mit Berechnung".

Der marokkanische Außenminister Taleb Fassi-Fihri offenbarte wenige Tage nach den Ereignissen den wahren Grund, der von Nordafrika bis in den rund 5000 Kilometer entfernten Nahen Osten Besorgnis erregt: Die islamische Welt fürchtet eine kulturelle Infiltration durch den Iran. Man habe "schiitischen Aktivismus festgestellt", so der Außenminister, "insbesondere in der diplomatischen Vertretung in Rabat", die sich gegen "fundamentale religiöse Werte Marokkos" richtete und "den sunnitischen Maliki-Glauben bedrohen". Auch Innenminister Chakib Benmoussa bestätigte, Iraner missionierten im Königreich seit 2004, und zwar über kulturelle Zentren und mittels Verbreitung von Publikationen. Zudem studierten junge Marokkaner im Iran gratis, ganz auf Kosten der Islamischen Republik.

Laut der Zeitung "Al Jarida Al Aoula" wurden daraufhin Ende März Dutzende von Menschen in verschiedenen Städten Marokkos verhaftet, die mit dem schiitischen Islam sympathisierten. Bücher und Zeitschriften, die meisten im Libanon produziert, sollen beschlagnahmt worden sein. In Rabat schloss man die Irakische Schule mit der Begründung, "das Erziehungssystem ist gegen die Bestimmungen von Privatschulen". Die Direktorin der Schule habe "bestimmte religiöse Praktiken propagiert", womit natürlich schiitische Lehren gemeint sind.

Auch in Saudi-Arabien, wo der schiitische Bevölkerungsanteil bei zehn Prozent liegt, erfolgten diese Woche Razzien, 35 Personen wurden verhaftet. Der schiitische Scheich Nimr al-Nimr war allerdings nicht dabei, er tauchte vorsorglich unter. Im Februar hatte der Geistliche beim Freitagsgebet zur Abspaltung vom saudischen Königreich aufgefordert, nachdem es in der heiligen Stadt Medina zu heftigen Ausschreitungen zwischen schiitischen Pilgern und der Polizei gekommen war.

Vor der schiitischen Missionierung durch den Iran warnte Scheich Yusuf al-Qaradawi bereits 2008. Der von seiner Sendung "Scharia und Leben" auf al-Dschasira bekannte ägyptische Islam-Gelehrte hat innerhalb der vergangenen beiden Jahre beobachtet, "dass sunnitische Gesellschaften von einer organisierten schiitischen Missionarsarbeit heimgesucht sind". In Ägypten habe es noch vor 20 Jahren keinen einzigen Schiiten gegeben, aber sie hätten es geschafft, das Land zu infiltrieren. "Sie haben Leute, die in der Presse schreiben, Bücher publizieren, und sie haben ein Publikum." Das Gleiche sei im Sudan, in Tunesien, Algerien, Marokko und auch in nicht arabischen Ländern wie Malaysia, Indonesien, Nigeria und dem Senegal passiert. Realität oder die Verschwörungstheorie eines sunnitischen Geistlichen, der mit 82 Jahren bereits in die Jahre gekommen ist?

Tatsächlich gibt es Anzeichen einer schiitischen Mission. 2006 wurden auf der Buchmesse in Sudans Hauptstadt Khartoum Bücher beschlagnahmt, die sich über sunnitische Glaubensinhalte, den Propheten Mohammed und seine Familie lustig machen. Bücher, die über diplomatisches Gepäck der iranischen Botschaft ins Land gekommen waren. In Jordanien beklagten sich Parlamentarier, Schiiten würden versuchen, arme sunnitische Familien zu konvertieren. Und in Algerien berichtete die Zeitung "Echourok" von besorgten Eltern, die einen Brief an die Behörden schrieben, nachdem ihre Kinder in der Schule mit schiitischen Inhalten gefüttert worden waren.

Weit schwerwiegender ist dagegen die Enttarnung des Belliradsch-Terrornetzwerks in Marokko 2008. Ein Teil der Mitglieder soll in Ausbildungslagern der schiitischen Hisbollah im Libanon trainiert worden sein. Unter den 35 Verhafteten war - neben dem Führer einer verbotenen sunnitisch-islamistischen Gruppe und einem Mitglied der Partei für Gerechtigkeit und Entwicklung - der Korrespondent des Hisbollah-Senders al-Manar. Für Marokko, aber auch für andere sunnitische Staaten eine erschreckende Kombination. Sunnitische Islamisten erhalten finanzielle Hilfe, militärische Ausrüstung und Training von vom Iran gesponserten schiitischen Militanten.

Bekanntestes Beispiel für eine derartige Kooperation ist die palästinensische Hamas, die von der Hisbollah logistisch, vom Iran finanziell und angeblich auch militärisch unterstützt wird. Ein Bündnis, das dem Iran und der Hisbollah bei den rund 1,5 Milliarden Muslimen große Pluspunkte bringt. Hassan Nasrallah, der Hisbollah-Generalsekretär, gilt als einer der beliebtesten und vertrauenswürdigsten Politiker der Region.

Die bedingungslose Unterstützung der Hamas bis zum "Kollaps Israels", wie Irans Präsident Mahmud Ahmadinedschad gern beteuert, ist mit einer der Gründe für die Spaltung des arabischen Lagers. Zu dem Gipfeltreffen der Arabischen Liga im März in Doha wurde der iranische Präsident zuerst ein- und später wieder ausgeladen. "Wir brauchen eine gemeinsame Vision für die arabische Sicherheit und wie wir mit der iranischen Herausforderung umgehen", forderte der Außenminister Saudi-Arabiens, Prinz Saud al-Faisal. Daraus spricht die Sorge über eine Atombombe des Irans, welche die Führungsrolle der Islamischen Republik in der Region ein für alle Mal festschreiben würde.

Eine arabische Einheitsfront gegen den Iran wird es jedoch nicht geben, solange Syrien und Qatar mit dem Iran gute Beziehungen pflegen und auch aktiv die Hamas unterstützen. Sorgenvoll betrachtet man in Saudi-Arabien, Jordanien oder auch in Ägypten die Gesprächsbereitschaft von US-Präsident Barack Obama mit dem Iran. "Die USA denken, eine Einigung mit dem Iran sei der Schlüssel für die Probleme der Region", sagte Musafa Alani, Sicherheitsexperte in Dubai. "Aber das beängstigt uns. So etwas könnte zu großen Zugeständnissen führen und unsere Sicherheit untergraben."

Donnerstag, 2. April 2009

Endstation Mittelmeer

Die Katastrophe vor Libyen wird dem Flüchtlingsstrom nach Europa kein Ende setzen. Beim internationalen Menschenschmuggel spielt Staatschef al-Gaddafi eine Schlüsselrolle

Es sollte eine Fahrt in eine goldene Zukunft werden. Dicht gedrängt saßen rund 350 Menschen hoffnungsvoll in einem Fischerboot, mit dem sie die 1770 Kilometer bis nach Europa auf der anderen Seite des Mittelmeers zurücklegen wollten. Aber das Holzboot, eigentlich nur für 75 Passagiere zugelassen, hatte ein Leck und sank sehr schnell bei stürmischem Wetter. Nur 21 Menschen konnten gerettet werden. Die Insassen der anderen drei Boote, die ebenfalls am vergangenen Wochenende von der libyschen Küste aus in See stachen, hatten mehr Glück. Eines wurde nach einem Maschinenschaden von der libyschen Küstenwache aufgebracht, die beiden anderen schafften es nach Italien und Malta. 77 Tote wurden aus dem Wasser gefischt oder an den Strand gespült. Sie kamen aus Somalia, Nigeria, Eritrea, Algerien, Marokko, Palästina und Tunesien. Unter den Passagieren des aufgebrachten Bootes befanden sich auch Ägypter und Bangladescher.

Libyen ist die derzeit wichtigste Transitroute nach Europa. Das UN-Flüchtlingswerk schätzt, dass 2008 mehr als 67 000 Menschen die gefährliche Reise in einem dieser Fischerboote unternommen haben. 37 000 davon erreichten Italien (2007 waren es 19 000), die anderen Griechenland oder Malta. Mehr als 1700 kamen beim Versuch, ihren Traum zu erfüllen, ums Leben.

"Wenn man ein gutes Leben will, muss man eben etwas riskieren", sagt Jeffrey aus Nigeria, der vor vier Jahren sein Heimatland Richtung Europa verließ. "Dort findet man immer Arbeit, kann sich ein Auto leisten und eine Wohnung kaufen. Es geht einem einfach gut." Von einer Wirtschaftskrise will der junge Mann aus Schwarzafrika nichts hören. Er hat ein geregeltes Auskommen als Elektriker, sein kleines Haus und seine Familie zurückgelassen und es gegen die Ungewissheit der illegalen Immigration getauscht. Nach Jahren der Odyssee durch Mali, Algerien und Marokko ist er mit einer Schwimmweste für 500 Euro nach Ceuta, in die spanische Exklave an der Nordspitze Afrikas, geschwommen. Seit zehn Monaten sitzt er dort im Auffanglager und wartet auf einen Entscheid der Behörden, ob er bleiben darf oder deportiert wird.

Ihre Lebensgrundlage setzte auch eine Reihe von indischen Bauern aus der Region Punjab aufs Spiel. Um die Reise von Indien über Afrika bis nach Ceuta zu finanzieren, haben sie ihr Land verkauft oder ihr Haus an die Bank verpfändet. "Umgerechnet 7000 Euro habe ich bekommen", erzählt einer von insgesamt 54 indischen Migranten, die seit einem Jahr auf dem Berg von Ceuta im Wald campen. Familienbesitz und Ersparnisse landeten in den Händen von Menschenschmugglern, die sie im Auto versteckt oder im Boot über die Grenze brachten. "15 000 Euro hat jeder von uns bezahlt", meint Gurpreet, der Sprecher der Gruppe, der selbst an der Universität Ökonomie studierte. Allen droht nun die Deportation zurück in ihr Heimatland.

"In der Regel sind es nicht die Ärmsten der Armen", erklärt Rickard Sandell, der als Spezialist für Demografie am Real Instituto Elcano in Madrid forscht. "Sie haben Schulen, Universitäten besucht, verfügen über eine berufliche Ausbildung, und es gibt Ersparnisse, die den schweren Schritt der Immigration erst ermöglichen." Die Ärmsten könnten ja nie jemanden bezahlen, der sie nach Europa brächte. "Wahrscheinlich verfügen sie nicht einmal über die Information, wohin man immigrieren könnte. Spanien oder andere Länder Europas haben sie noch nie im Fernsehen gesehen, da dieses Gerät ein unerreichbarer Luxus ist."

Jeffrey aus Nigeria, die Bauern aus Punjab und etwa 2000 weitere Migranten aus aller Welt sitzen entweder in Ceuta oder in Marokko fest. Die Transitroute durch den Maghreb über die bei Tanger nur 14 Kilometer breite Meerenge von Gibraltar funktioniert nicht mehr. Vor zehn Jahren konnte man noch von der marokkanischen Küste aus mit "pateras", kleinen Schnellbooten, nach Spanien übersetzen. Heute ist das kaum mehr möglich. 2002 installierte Spanien in Algeciras das SIVE, eine 300 Millionen teure Hightechanlage zur Überwachung der Meerenge. Zudem erhielten die marokkanischen Behörden Zuschüsse der EU, um die Küste flächendeckender zu überwachen.

Seitdem entwickelte sich Libyen zum Transitland und Sprungbrett nach Europa. Die 1770 Kilometer lange Überfahrt gilt als weit weniger gefährlich als von der Küste Senegals oder Mauretaniens auf die Kanarischen Inseln. Zudem ist die sozialistische libysche Volksrepublik ein Einwanderungsland, in dem fremde Nationalitäten nicht auffallen. Rund 1,2 Millionen Ausländer sollen im Staat von Muammar al-Gaddafi leben, von denen die wenigsten jedoch legalen Status haben. 500 000 bis 600 000 kommen allein aus dem benachbarten Ägypten. Die andere Hälfte stammt überwiegend aus den Ländern der Subsahara. Lange Jahre wurden die Immigranten ohne Papiere von den libyschen Behörden geduldet. Inzwischen aber hat sich die Situation für die afrikanischen Migranten geändert. Staatspräsident al-Gaddafi musste nun auch in Sachen illegaler Immigration mit der EU kooperieren, was er früher stets verweigert hatte. Von nun an deportierte das libysche Innenministerium. 2006 allein 64 330 Immigranten, was den Staat vier Millionen Euro gekostet haben soll. Bis heute existiert sogar der Plan einer Massendeportation aller Ausländer ohne gültige Aufenthaltsgenehmigung. Aufgrund internationaler Proteste, darunter auch das UN-Flüchtlingswerk, wurde er bisher nicht ausgeführt.

In der libyschen Hafenstadt Swara, nahe der tunesischen Grenze, von wo aus die Boote nach Italien starten, werden regelmäßig Razzien durchgeführt. Dabei geht die Polizei wenig zimperlich vor. Die Regierung von Ghana beschwerte sich offiziell über die schlechte Behandlung ihrer etwa 10 000 Staatsangehörigen in Libyen. Sie würden unter unmenschlichen Bedingungen repatriiert. Man würde ihnen ihre Pässe abnehmen und ohne Gerichtsverfahren ins Gefängnis sperren. Den Migranten, die nach Europa wollen, scheint das egal zu sein. Die Willkür der libyschen Polizei schreckt sie nicht ab. Sie kommen weiterhin, um ihren großen Traum vom goldenen Europa zu erfüllen - auch wenn es sie das Leben kostet.

Publiziert in der Welt 2.04.09

Montag, 16. März 2009

Ein Kindersoldat will nach Europa

Die Geschichte des jungen Liberianers Eric, der wie viele andere Afrikaner in der spanischen Exklave Ceuta vom Asyl in der EU träumt

Ceuta - Die Gegner fallen wie die Fliegen. Zuerst die da vorne erschießen, dann rechts alle niedermachen, bevor der Rest im Gebüsch erledigt wird. Kriegsspiele auf einem Parkplatz im Zentrum der spanischen Stadt Ceuta, von Eric, einem jungen Mann aus Liberia. Seine Waffe ein Regenschirm, mit dem er durch die parkenden Autos schleicht, auf die er aufpasst, um ein paar Cent von den Fahrern zu bekommen.

Eine etwas seltsame Situation, denn auf imaginäre Gegner zu schießen, passt wenig zu dem ausgewachsenen 19-Jährigen. Eher würde man von ihm erwarten, dass er aus Langeweile bei der Arbeit Verse vor sich hin rappt oder ein Buch liest. Nur bei Eric Christian Carr hat sich die Welt auf den Kopf gestellt. In der Zeit, in der andere Kinder mit Luftkugeln durch die Gegend ballern, trug er eine echte Waffe. "Eine AK-47, besser bekannt unter Kalaschnikow", sagt der Liberianer ein paar Tage später vor einem Teller Pommes mit Mayo in einer typisch spanischen Tapas-Bar. "Eine beliebte Waffe, weil sie von jedem leicht zu bedienen ist und so gut wie nie Ladehemmung hat. Man kann sich darauf verlassen."

Mit zehn Jahren begann Erics unfreiwillige Karriere als Kindersoldat. Mit seinem Vater war er nach Beginn des zweiten liberianischen Bürgerkriegs (1999-2003) auf der Flucht ins Nachbarland Guinea, wo sie bereits während des ersten Kriegs (1989-1997) Unterschlupf gefunden hatten. An einem Checkpoint im Norden Liberias wurden Vater und Sohn angehalten. "Sie haben die Leute nach Stammeszugehörigkeit aussortiert", erinnert sich Eric. "In unserer Gruppe waren sechs Krahn-Mitglieder, darunter auch mein Vater. Vor meinen Augen wurden alle sofort erschossen." Damit verlor der damals Neunjährige auch den letzten Elternteil, nachdem seine Mutter bereits bei der Geburt gestorben war.

Mit anderen Kindern wurde Eric auf Lkws verladen, sie bekamen ein Messer geschenkt und später ein Waffentraining im Busch. Von nun an galt es für die Rebellengruppe Lurd (Vereinigte Liberianer für Aussöhnung und Demokratie) zu kämpfen, die vorher den Namen Ulimo (Vereinigte Befreiungsbewegung von Liberia für Demokratie) hatte und für unzählige Grausamkeiten an Zivilisten bekannt war. Lurd kämpfte für die Absetzung Präsident Charles Taylors, der selbst durch Bürgerkrieg an die Macht gekommen war und dem heute wegen Kriegsverbrechen vor einem UN-Gericht in Sierra Leone der Prozess gemacht wird.

Die Lurd-Rebellen finanzierten sich durch Plünderungen und Diamanten, die gegen Waffen eingetauscht wurden. "Wir waren eine Gruppe von etwa 30 Leuten, die im Busch lebten, und hatten einfach alles", erzählt Eric schmunzelnd, als wäre das Ganze damals eine große Party gewesen. "Geld, Alkohol, Drogen und gut zu essen. Wir haben uns einfach genommen, was wir wollten." Sie zogen von Überfall zu Überfall, eine marodierende Bande, die nichts mit Politik zu tun hatte, von ihr nur missbraucht wurde. Die Hälfte der Truppe waren Kinder im gleichen Alter wie Eric, der Rest zwischen 15 und maximal 25. Darunter sein bester Freund Ibrahim, "der schon mit 22 oder 23 Jahren ein sehr tapferer Kerl war".

Alle Mitglieder der Bande glaubten, magische Kräfte zu besitzen, die sie unverwundbar machten. Drogen sorgten für Furchtlosigkeit. "Wir hatten Tabletten, die man mit ein bisschen Wasser auflöste und trank. Man fühlte sich rundherum stark und gut." Bei den Raubzügen töteten sie immer wieder Menschen, vergewaltigten und kidnappten Frauen. "Diejenigen, die sich weigerten, wurden erschossen, oder man schnitt ihnen die Brüste ab. Fand jemand aus der Gruppe an einem Mädchen Gefallen, hat er sie einfach mitgenommen. Sie kochte dann für uns und wurde ein Mitglied unserer Gemeinschaft", sagt Eric mit einem Ton, als sei es das Normalste der Welt, Sex- und Arbeitssklaven zu haben. Frauen zu besitzen gehörte in der Truppe offensichtlich zum guten Ton, eine Art Statussymbol eines erfolgreichen Kriegers. Selbst die Kindersoldaten wollten darauf nicht verzichten. "Wir Kleinen hatten auch unsere Frauen", berichtet Eric, "obwohl wir nicht das machen konnten, was die Großen taten. Wir fingerten eben an den Frauen herum und ließen sie sonst all das machen, was uns einfach in den Sinn kam."

Ihm sei nichts anderes übrig geblieben, erklärt er weiter. "Wer nicht mitmachte, den hat man sofort erschossen." Mit einem Gewehrlauf am Kopf würde jeder das tun, was man von ihm verlangte. Ob er jemand getötet habe, wisse er nicht. Er habe nur zur Selbstverteidigung geschossen, und das immer aus Entfernung, nie im Kampf Mann gegen Mann. "Was soll man schon tun, wenn die ATU angreift?" Eric meint damit die Antiterroreinheit, die aufseiten der Regierung von Präsident Charles Taylor kämpfte. Eine Einheit, die Gegner folterte, plünderte und ethnische Säuberungen vornahm.

Bei einem der Angriffe von Regierungssoldaten im Jahr 2002 konnte Eric, zusammen mit seinem Freund Ibrahim, schließlich flüchten. "Sie erschossen viele von uns, und alles ging drunter und drüber." Eine gute Gelegenheit, sich aus dem Staub zu machen, denn "man konnte sonst nicht einfach davonlaufen. Das war schwierig und lebensgefährlich". Mit Ibrahim schaffte er es nach Jekepa, einer Grenzstadt zu Guinea. Dort ordneten sie sich in die Warteschlangen der Flüchtlinge ein, erhielten Essen und Kleidung von UN-Hilfsorganisationen. Bis 2005 besuchte Eric eine christliche Flüchtlingsschule in der Stadt Siguiri am Niger-Fluss, bevor er sich endgültig von Guinea auf den Weg zu einem besseres Leben nach Europa aufmachte.

Zwei Jahre dauert seine Odyssee durch Mali, Algerien und Marokko bis er am 10. November 2007 in Ceuta ankommt, der spanischen Exklave im Norden von Marokko. Aus einer nahe gelegenen marokkanischen Kleinstadt geht es mitten in der Nacht durchs Meer in die spanische Hafenstadt auf marokkanischem Territorium. Da Eric nicht schwimmen kann, bindet man ihm eine Leine um den Bauch. "Ein Junge schwamm vor mir und zog mich mit meiner Schwimmweste durch das Wasser." Das Ganze kostete 300 Euro, eine Summe, die Eric in alter Kindersoldatenmanier erbeutet hatte. Zusammen mit Kollegen, erzählt er lapidar, habe man andere schwarzafrikanische Migranten in Marokko gekidnappt und für ihre Freilassung Lösegeld verlangt. Wer nicht bezahlen wollte, "bei dem wurde nachgeholfen".

Nun wohnt der 19-jährige Liberianer im Ceti (Zentrum für temporären Aufenthalt von Immigranten) von Ceuta und wartet darauf, dass seinem Antrag auf politisches Asyl in Spanien stattgegeben wird. "Ohne Eltern, ohne Familie, zudem ist mein Stamm nicht erwünscht, da kann mich niemand nach Liberia zurückschicken", behauptet der ehemalige Kindersoldat überzeugt. Ohne den festen Glauben an eine Zukunft würde er verrückt werden. Was er denn auf der iberischen Halbinsel tun möchte? "Ich bin ein ausgezeichneter Fußballspieler, der in der 2. Liga anfangen und dann in die erste wechseln könnte. Die andere Möglichkeit ist Hip-Hop, das kann ich auch sehr gut. Ich bin schon im lokalen Fernsehen von Ceuta aufgetreten", fügt er nicht ohne Stolz an. Wenn beides allerdings nicht klappen sollte, würde der Fan von Manchester United und Christiano Ronaldo auch jede andere erdenkliche Arbeit annehmen. "Ich kann alles machen. Ich weiß, wie man Geld macht."

Publiziert am 16.03.09 in der Welt